Bereavement

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Death is a topic many of us avoid; it is unsettling, and difficult to confront the concept of losing a loved one.

However, it is a good idea to have a discussion to establish your relative’s wishes. This can give them peace of mind, a greater sense of control, and you a practical plan to carry forward.

Two pairs of hands touching to offer comfort.Getting the affairs of the deceased in order can be stressful, and this is intensified if you don’t know where to start. This section provides financial information on bereavement benefits for residents of Northern Ireland as well as practicalities and palliative care. The Money Advice Service provides further free & impartial information on funerals, wills, tax and probate.

Make sure that the information you read on The Money Advice Service website refers to Northern Ireland. Links to the Money Advice Service and other specialist organisations can be found throughout this guide.

Getting Support

It is not only family and friends who are affected by death, but also professionals and volunteers who support patients and their families.

There are several support services that can help in the event of a bereavement.

The Bereavement network has been established by the Northern Ireland HSC [Health & Social Care agency].  Information is provided for professionals working in this field, with useful resources and tips on self-care. It also contains support for the bereaved, including links to various support agencies and charities. 

Cruse Bereavement Care provides vital support and information. This is via telephone, on-line and face-to-face support, with offices across Northern Ireland. 

Call 028 9079 2419 (N.I.office) or the National Helpline: 0844 477 9400.

The Bereavement Register can stop unwanted direct mail addressed to the deceased person.

Call: 0800 082 1230

Seek Advice

The death of a partner/spouse can impact your benefits as well and you may be entitled to bereavement benefits whether you work or not.